Can I Play Golf In Tier 4?

Can I Play Golf In Tier 4
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

England Golf

Sport Golf
Founded 1924
Affiliation The R&A Ladies’ Golf Union
Headquarters National Golf Centre, Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire
Official website
www,englandgolf,org

England Golf is the governing body for male and female amateur golf in England, It represents over 1,900 golf clubs with over 740,000 members and is affiliated to The R&A, the joint global governing body of golf. It was formed in 2012 as a merger between the English Golf Union, the governing body for men, and the English Women’s Golf Association, the equivalent body for women.

Can you play golf in groups of 4?

The Fivesome in Golf (And Why Some Courses Don’t Allow It) “Fivesome” is a golf term that means five golfers are playing together as a group. Different golfers, and golf courses, have different attitudes about fivesomes. What is key to know about them is that many golf courses don’t allow golfers to play in groups of five.

  1. In golf parlance, a twosome is a group of two golfers who tee off together (just the two of them) and play the golf course.
  2. A threesome has three golfers, a foursome has four golfers, a fivesome has five golfers.
  3. The preferred grouping by golf courses is a foursome: four golfers teeing off together, as a group, and playing the course together, as a group.

Sometimes a group will only include three golfers and the golf course doesn’t have a single to add, and so those three tee off as a group. But most golf courses prefer groups of four and will, unless it is a day of light traffic on the golf course, try to fill in any groups to produce foursomes.

  1. If four is good, is five better? As noted above, many golf courses don’t allow fivesomes.
  2. The reason is that once a group grows beyond four golfers, adding more (in the view of many golf courses) to the group simply starts slowing things down.
  3. It takes longer for a fivesome to play each hole, because on each hole there are five golfers playing strokes, rather than four.

Makes sense, right? Therefore, a fivesome on the course, or multiple fivesomes in a row, can start to slow down play all around the golf course, causing backups and bottlenecks. Another issue with fivesomes is the use of riding carts. In a foursome, the golfers naturally pair off two per cart.

But a fivesome requires three carts, and one of those carts will have only one rider. Of course, there are plenty of golfers who want to play in fivesomes because theirs is a group of five buddies and they want to all play in the same group. If you have four buddies and, therefore, want to play in a fivesome, what should you do? As a courtesy, call ahead and ask the pro shop if they allow fivesomes.

They might say no — but they also might say yes. They also might say, “It depends.” If it’s a golf course that is not typically busy at the time you want to play, the pro shop personnel might say it’s OK to arrive with a fivesome. To sum up: A fivesome is a group of five golfers playing together; golf courses much prefer foursomes; many golf courses don’t allow fivesomes, so it’s a good idea to get the OK from a course before showing up with a fivesome.

Can you golf in a group of 5?

Since there is no official ruling against groups of five or more players, it is possible to play golf as a group of five. However, due to the risk of slow play, a golf course is well within its rights to forbid five-balls.

Can you play golf in London in December?

Although the golf season runs from April to September, golf is a sport that can be enjoyed all year round.

What ages can play golf?

At What Age Should Kids Start Golf Lessons? – ​At what age a child can start kids golf lessons will vary depending on the coaches in your area. Many coaches will take children as young as five, and other programs have higher age minimums. As soon as a child starts to show interest in golf is the best time to start teaching them how to play.

You can introduce a child as young as three to golf, and they can begin learning at home or by playing mini-golf. For older kids, there are even academies and boarding schools if the sport becomes a real passion. ​ ​ ​Children between the ages of three to five should be allowed to use golf freely as a form of play and fun.

It’s important that this age group not be given too much technical instruction. If you push, they may lose interest. You should provide them with the right size club and show them how to hold it. Spend time with them hitting balls around the yard and riding around in golf carts.

​ ​By the age of five, children may be able to join in on kids’ golf lessons, individually or in a group. Group lessons are a good start and will teach them etiquette and sportsmanship. Now is the time to make sure they don’t start to develop bad habits that they’ll have to work to undo later. Patience here will be necessary.

If they’re interested in other sports too, it’s essential not to limit them to just golf at this age. If their interest in golf continues to grow, they can specialize as they get a bit older. ​​ ​For kids with keen interest, this age group can start to see benefits from individual junior golf lessons. This age group is when kids will also begin to transition from kids clubs to adult clubs. Kids in this age group can also enjoy more options for golf programs, summer camps, and academies.

What is a 4 play in golf?

Four-Ball is a form of play (in either match play or stroke play) involving partners where: Two partners compete together as a side, with each player playing their own ball, and. A side’s score for a hole is the lower score of the two partners on that hole.

How do you play 2v2 golf handicaps?

2-Person ODD & EVEN, using your USGA Handicap – This is a 2-person team event. The person with the lowest handicap of the team has his/her net ball count only on the Odd Number Holes. The person with the higher handicap of the two has his/her net ball count only on the Even Number Holes.

Can you golf with 3?

Nines – While there are plenty of different formats that golf enthusiasts can use while playing, one format that is reserved only for three players is called Nines, otherwise also known as “5-3-1.” What makes Nines such a great game to play if you happen to have just three players is that the game is extremely easy to understand and play.

This means, in the three player format, you do not have to be an expert or know your way around the golf course to get an idea of how the game works. This is also one of the reasons why this game is considered to be the ideal choice for those who are new to playing golf. When playing this gameplay format, points are given to each of the three players based on their score on each hole.

So, how does that work? As the name suggests, when playing this game, each hole in the round will have nine points. So, there will be nine points at stake for all three players. The points are divided up among all three players following a simple rule.

  1. The player who has got the lowest score out of all three will get a total of five points, while the golfer with the second-lowest score will get three points.
  2. The player that has the high score is awarded one point.
  3. Now, all you have to do is add up all of the accumulated points on every hole, and the winner will be the player who has the most points at the end of the round.

This game was created by golfers who enjoy a little competition, even if it is a friendly match. So, what happens if it’s a tie? There are many times that more than one player will share a low or high score. When it comes to ties in Nines, you will need to follow these simple rules: When a single golfer has a low score while the other two golfers have a tie score, then the player with the low score will get five points while the other two players will be awarded two points each.

But if two players have a tie for a low score, then those two players will be awarded four points each while the player with the higher score of the three will get one point. In circumstances where all three players have a tie on a hole, then the nine points will be divided equally. As in, all three golfers will get three points each on the hole.

The point structure in three player gameplay, used in the game of nines, somewhat follows the same rules as another famous golf game known as Split Sixes or English. Nines can also be played with or without using handicaps. If you do decide to use handicaps, then the handicap allowance should be distributed per hole as shown on the scorecard.

What is a group of 4 golfers called?

Golf Terminology | Golf Course Management | Las Vegas Golf Organizing a golf outing can be intimidating at times, so we have gathered some of the most common golf terms and phrases you might encounter. If you come across something not on the list, just ask and we’ll be happy to explain.

  • A more comprehensive listing can be found on the website.19th Hole The clubhouse bar.
  • Players typically gather in the 19th Hole after their round to tally scores, settle bets and enjoy some beverages.
  • Ace When a player hits the ball directly from the tee into the hole with one stroke.
  • Also called a hole in one.

Albatross A hole played three strokes under par, also called a Double Eagle. Approach shot A shot intended to land the ball on the green. Apron The grass surface on the perimeter of the green that separates it from the surrounding fairway or rough. Also known as the fringe.

Automatic Two-putt When a golf course, or tournament, declares that players may consider the ball to be holed in no more than two putts once their ball is on the putting surface (most commonly used as a tournament rule to speed up play) Example: Automatic two-putt is not allowed within the rules of golf, but courses can institute it as a local rule in casual play when conditions warrant.

Away Describing the golfer whose ball is farthest from the hole. The player who is away should always play first. Back nine The last nine holes of an 18 hole golf course. Playing the back nine is called “heading in”.

  • Backswing The backward part of the swing starting from the ground and going back behind the head.
  • Ball-marker A token or a small coin used to spot the ball’s position on the green prior to lifting it.
  • Ball-washer A device found on many tee boxes for cleaning golf balls.

Best ball A form of team play using two, three, or four person teams. The team score on each hole is the lowest score obtained by one of the team members. For example, if player A has a 5, player B has a 6, player C has a 4, and player D has a 5, the “best ball” and team score is a 4.

Birdie A hole played in one stroke under par. Bogey A hole played one stroke over par. Break The tendency of a putted ball to roll left or right of a straight line. This deviation may be a result of a number of factors or combination of factors including uneven surface, grain of the grass, how firmly the putt is struck or, in extreme circumstances, wind.

Bump and run A low-trajectory shot that is intended to get the ball rolling along the fairway and up onto the green. Similar to a chip shot, but played from a greater distance. Bunker A depression in bare ground that is usually covered with sand. Also called a “sand trap”.

It is considered a hazard under the Rules of Golf. Caddy or Caddie A person, often paid, who carries a player’s clubs and offers advice. Players are responsible for the actions of their caddies. Players cannot receive advice from anyone other than their caddy or partner. Carry How far the ball travels through the air.

Casual water Any temporary standing water visible after a player has taken his stance. Snow and ice can also be taken as casual water, as well as water that overflows the banks of existing water hazards. You may take relief from casual water no nearer to the hole according to the rules of golf.

  • Chip A short shot (typically played from very close to and around the green), that is intended to travel through the air over a very short distance and roll the remainder of the way to the hole.
  • Chunk A swing that results in the clubhead hitting the ground before the ball, resulting in a large chunk of ground being taken as a divot.

Also called a “fat” shot, or “chili-dipping”. Club (i) An implement used by a player to hit a golf ball. A player is allowed to carry up to fourteen (14) clubs during a round of golf. (ii) An organized group of golfers, usually owning or managing a golf course.

Iii) The entirety of a golf facility, including course, club-house, pro-shop, practice areas etc. Clubhead The part of a club that used to strike the ball. Clubface The surface of the clubhead which is designed to strike the golf ball. Striking the ball with the center of the clubface maximizes distance and accuracy.

Course Rating Course rating is a numerical value given to each set of tees at a particular golf course to approximate the number of strokes it should take a scratch golfer to complete the course. Dimples The round indentations on a golf ball cover which are scientifically designed to enable the ball to make a steady and true flight.

  1. Dimples, by reducing drag, allow a golf ball to stay in the air for a longer flight than would be possible with a smooth ball.
  2. Divot (i) The chunk of grass and earth displaced during a stroke.
  3. Ii) The indentation on the green caused by the ball on an approach shot; more properly called a pitch mark or ball mark.

Dogleg A left or right bend in the fairway. Double bogey A hole played two strokes over par. Double eagle A hole played three strokes under par. Also called an Albatross. Downswing The motion of swinging a club from the top of the swing to the point of impact.

  • Draw A shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves to the left; often played intentionally by skilled golfers.
  • An overdone draw usually becomes a hook.
  • Eagle A hole played in two strokes under par.
  • Even Having a score equal to that of par.
  • Fade A shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves slightly to the right, and is often played intentionally by skilled golfers.

An overdone fade will appear similar to a slice. Fairway The area of the course between the tee and the green that is well-maintained allowing a good lie for the ball. Flagstick A tall marker, often a metal pole with a flag at the top, used to indicate the position of the hole on a green.

Also called the “pin”. An additional smaller flag, or other marker, is sometimes positioned on the flagstick to indicate the location of the hole (front, middle, or back) on the green. Fore A warning shout given when there is a chance that the ball may hit other players or spectators. Fourball In matchplay, a contest between two sides, each consisting of a pair of players, where every individual plays his own ball throughout.

On every hole, the lower of the two partner’s scores is matched against the lower of the opposition’s scores. (Fourballs are the opening matches played on the Friday and Saturday mornings of the Ryder Cup). In strokeplay, a fourball competition is played between several teams each consisting of 2 players, where for every hole the lower of the two partner’s scores counts toward the team’s 18 hole total.

  • The term ‘fourball’ is often used informally to describe any group of 4 players on the course.
  • Foursomes In matchplay, a contest between two sides each consisting of a pair of players, where the 2 partners hit alternate shots on one ball.
  • The first player tees off, the second player hits the second shot, the first player hits the third shot, and so on until the ball is holed.
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Also partners alternate their tee shots, so that one member of each team will always tee-off on the odd holes and the other will tee off on the even holes. (Foursomes are the afternoon matches played on the Friday and Saturday of the Ryder Cup). In strokeplay, a foursome competition is played between several teams each consisting of a pair of players, where partners play alternate shots until the SINGLE ball is holed.

The term ‘foursome’ is often incorrectly used to describe any group of 4 players on the course. Front Nine Holes 1 through 9 on a golf course. Gimme Refers to a putt that the other players agree can count automatically without actually being played (under the tacit assumption that the putt would not have been missed).

“Gimmes” are not allowed by the rules in stroke play, but they are often practiced in casual matches. However, in match play, either player may formally concede a stroke, a hole, or the entire match at any time, and this may not be refused or withdrawn.

  1. A player in match play will generally concede a tap-in or other short putt by his or her opponent.
  2. Golf club (i) An implement used by a player to hit a golf ball.
  3. A player is allowed to carry up to fourteen (14) clubs during a round of golf.
  4. Ii) An organized group of golfers, usually owning or managing a golf course.

(iii) The entirety of a golf facility, including course, club-house, pro-shop, practice areas etc. Green The area of specially prepared grass around the hole, where putts are played. Handicap A number assigned to each player based on his ability and used to adjust each player’s score to provide equality among the players.

  • In simplified terms, a handicap number, based on the slope of a course, is subtracted from the player’s gross score and gives him a net score of par or better half the time.
  • Hazard Any bunker or permanent water including any ground marked as part of that water hazard.
  • Special rules apply when playing from a hazard.

Hole A circular hole in the ground which is also called “the cup”, 4.25 inches in diameter.

  1. Hole in One Getting the ball directly from the tee into the hole with one stroke.
  2. Iron A club with a flat-faced solid metal head generally numbered from 1 to 9 indicating increasing loft.
  3. Knock-down A type of shot designed to have a very low trajectory, usually employed to combat strong winds.

Lie (i) How the ball is resting on the ground, which may add to the difficulty of the next stroke. (ii) The angle between the center of the shaft and the sole of the clubhead. Line The path the ball it expected to take following a stroke. This is of particular importance on the green, where stepping on another player’s line is considered a breach of etiquette.

  • Links A type of golf course, usually along a stretch of coastline.
  • Loft The angle between the club’s shaft and the club’s face.
  • Mulligan A do-over, or replay of the shot, without counting the shot as a stroke and without assessing any penalties that might apply.
  • It is not allowed by the rules and not practiced in official tournaments, but is common in casual rounds in some countries, especially the United States.

Charity tournaments can use the sale of mulligan tickets to raise additional revenue. Out-of-bounds The area designated as being outside the boundaries of the course. When a shot lands “O.B.”, the player “loses stroke and distance”, meaning that he/she must hit another shot from the original spot and is assessed a one-stroke penalty.

  • Par Apocryphally an abbreviation for “professional average result”, standard score for a hole (defined by its length) or a course (sum of all the holes’ pars).
  • Pin Slang for “flagstick”.
  • Pitch a short shot (typically from within 50 yards), usually played with a higher lofted club and made using a less than full swing, that is intended to flight the ball toward a target (usually the hole) with greater accuracy than a full iron shot.

Pitch mark Another term for a divot on the green caused when a ball lands. Players must repair their pitch marks, usually with a tee or a divot tool. Play Through Permission granted by a slow-moving group of players to a faster-moving group of players to pass them on the course.

Pro A professional is a golfer or person who plays or teaches golf for financial reward, may work as a touring pro in professional competitions, or as a teaching pro (also called a club pro). Punch shot A shot played with a very low trajectory, usually to avoid interference from tree branches when a player is hitting from the woods.

Similar to the knock-down, it can also be used to avoid high winds.

  1. Putt A shot played on the green, usually with a putter.
  2. Putting green A green usually found close to the club house used for warm up and to practice putting.
  3. Putter A special golf club with a very low loft that makes the ball roll.
  4. Rough The grass that borders the fairway, usually taller and coarser than the fairway.

Sand wedge A lofted club designed especially for playing out of a bunker. The modern sand wedge was invented by Gene Sarazen. Scramble When a player misses the green in regulation, but still makes par or better on a hole. Scrambling percentage is one of many statistics kept by the PGA Tour.

Also a two or four man format, similar to Best Ball, except in a scramble, each player strikes a shot, the best shot is selected, then all players play from that selected position. Scratch golfer A player’s whose handicap equals zero. Shamble A format, similar to a scramble, where every player hits from the tee, the best tee-shot is selected, and each player holes-out from the selected tee-shot.

Short game Shots that take place on or near the green. Putting, chipping, pitching, and greenside bunker play are all aspects of the short game. Slice A poor shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves sharply from the left to the right. A shot that follows the same direction but to a lesser degree is referred to as a fade or a cut and is often intentional.

The curved shape of the flight of the ball is a result of sideways spin. For that reason “slice” does not refer to a putt which “breaks”. Slope Rating Slope Rating is a number, from 55 to 155, used to determine the level of difficulty of a golf course for a bogey golfer. An “average” course has a slope rating of 113.

Snowman To score an eight on a hole. So-named because an eight (8) looks similar to the body of a snowman. Stableford A points based scoring system. The number of strokes taken on each hole relative to par translates into a set number of points, with the winner being the player who accumulates the highest number of points.

  1. Tap-in A ball that has come to rest very close to the hole, leaving only a very short putt to be played.
  2. Often recreational golfers will “concede” tap-ins to each other to speed up the pace of play.
  3. Tee A small peg, usually made of wood or plastic, placed in the ground upon which the golf ball may be placed prior to the first stroke on a hole.

May also refer to the teeing ground. Teeing Group The area from which you hit your drive or tee shot. The teeing ground for a particular set of tees is two club lengths in depth. The ball must be teed between the markers, called tees, that define the teeing ground’s width, and no further back than its depth.

Tees are colored, but there is no standard for colors. The “teeing ground” refers to one set of tees. Most courses have at least three sets of tees, some have more than twice that many. The areas where tee markers are placed are called “tee boxes”. Tips The championship tees on a golf course are known as “the tips”.

At Silverstone, the tips would be our set of silver tees. Topped An errant shot where the clubhead strikes on top of the ball, causing the ball to roll or bounce rather than fly. Unplayable A player can declare his ball unplayable at any time when it is in play (other than at a tee), and can drop the ball either within two club-lengths, or further from the hole in line with the hole and its current position, or where he played his last shot.

A penalty of one stroke is applied. A ball declared unplayable within a hazard must be dropped within that same hazard. Up and down Describes the situation where a player holes the ball in two strokes starting from off the green. The first stroke, usually a pitch, a bunker shot or a chip, gets the ball ‘up’ onto the green, and the subsequent putt gets the ball ‘down’ into the hole.

A variation is called “up and in”. Wedge A type of golf club; a subset of iron designed for short range strokes. Whiff An attempt to strike the ball where the player fails to make contact with the ball. A whiff must be counted as a stroke. Wood A type of club where the head is generally bulbous in shape except for the flatter clubface.

How many people can golf together at once?

Play of the game – 1=teeing ground, 2=water hazard, 3=rough, 4=out of bounds, 5= sand bunker, 6=water hazard, 7=fairway, 8=putting green, 9=flagstick, 10=hole Every round of golf is based on playing a number of holes in a given order. A “round” typically consists of 18 holes that are played in the order determined by the course layout.

  • Each hole is played once in the round on a standard course of 18 holes.
  • The game can be played by any number of people, although a typical group will have 1–4 people playing the round.
  • The typical amount of time required for pace of play is two hours for a 9-hole round and four hours for an 18-hole round.

Playing a hole on a golf course is initiated by putting a ball into play by striking it with a club on the teeing ground (also called the tee box, or simply the tee). For this first shot on each hole, it is allowed but not required for the golfer to place the ball on a tee prior to striking it.

  • A tee is a small peg that can be used to elevate the ball slightly above the ground up to a few centimetres high.
  • Tees are commonly made of wood but may be constructed of any material, including plastic.
  • Traditionally, golfers used mounds of sand to elevate the ball, and containers of sand were provided for the purpose.

A few courses still require sand to be used instead of peg tees, to reduce litter and reduce damage to the teeing ground. Tees help reduce the interference of the ground or grass on the movement of the club making the ball easier to hit, and also places the ball in the very centre of the striking face of the club (the “sweet spot”) for better distance.

When the initial shot on a hole is intended to move the ball a long distance, typically more than 225 yards (210 m), the shot is commonly called a “drive” and is generally made with a long-shafted, large-headed wood club called a “driver”. Shorter holes may be initiated with other clubs, such as higher-numbered woods or irons,

Once the ball comes to rest, the golfer strikes it again as many times as necessary using shots that are variously known as a “lay-up”, an “approach”, a “pitch”, or a ” chip “, until the ball reaches the green, where the golfer then ” putts ” the ball into the hole (commonly called “sinking the putt” or “holing out”).

The goal of getting the ball into the hole (“holing” the ball) in as few strokes as possible may be impeded by obstacles such as areas of longer grass called “rough” (usually found alongside fairways), which both slows any ball that contacts it and makes it harder to advance a ball that has stopped on it; “doglegs”, which are changes in the direction of the fairway that often require shorter shots to play around them; bunkers (or sand traps); and water hazards such as ponds or streams.

In stroke play competitions each player plays their ball until it is holed no matter how many strokes that may take. In match play it is acceptable to simply pick up one’s ball and “surrender the hole” after enough strokes have been made by a player that it is mathematically impossible for the player to win the hole.

It is also acceptable in informal stroke play to surrender the hole after hitting three strokes more than the “par” rating of the hole (a “triple bogey” – see below); while technically a violation of Rule 3–2, this practice speeds play as a courtesy to others, and avoids “runaway scores” and excessive frustration.

The total distance from the first teeing ground to the 18th green can be quite long; total yardages “through the green” can be in excess of 7,000 yards (6.4 km), and when adding in the travel distance between the green of one hole and the tee of the next, even skilled players may easily travel five miles (8 km) or more during a round.

  • At some courses, gas or electric golf carts are used to travel between shots, which can speed-up play and allows participation by individuals unable to walk a whole round.
  • On other courses players generally walk the course, either carrying their bag using a shoulder strap or using a “golf trolley” for their bag.

These trolleys may or may not be battery assisted. At many amateur tournaments including U.S. high school and college play, players are required to walk and to carry their own bags, but at the professional and top amateur level, as well as at high-level private clubs, players may be accompanied by caddies, who carry and manage the players’ equipment and who are allowed by the rules to give advice on the play of the course.

Is golf allowed in Tier 4 London?

On Saturday 19 December, the Prime Minister announced that a new tier of coronavirus (Covid-19) restrictions would be introduced across certain parts of England. Tier 4 will initially apply to London and the south east and comes into force on Sunday 20 December.

To find out what alert tier your area is in, click here and enter your postcode, A live list of the areas that fall within each tier can be found on the government’s website, 

The new regulations will have implications for sport and physical activity, and we’re working with the government to provide comprehensive guidance as to what is and isn’t allowed within this tier. We’ll update our website as soon as we can, but in the meantime, we can confirm the following applies across tier 4:

People can exercise outdoors or visit some public outdoor places, such as parks, the countryside, public gardens or outdoor sports facilities. They can continue to do unlimited exercise alone, or in a public outdoor place with their household, support bubble, or one other person. Outdoor sports facilities are allowed to open and can be used by individual households, bubbles or two people from different households. This applies to outdoor sports courts, outdoor gyms, golf courses, outdoor swimming pools, archery/driving/shooting ranges, riding centres and playgrounds. Organised outdoor sport for under-18s (including those who were under 18 on 31 August 2020) and disabled people is allowed. Indoor sport is allowed for under-18s for educational purposes or to facilitate childcare that enables parents or carers to work, seek work or take part in education. Adult sport can’t take place indoors under any circumstances, with gyms and swimming pools having to close. There are no exceptions for disabled people taking part in sport or physical activity indoors.

We know these new regulations will spark many questions from the sport and physical activity sector and we’ll update our frequently asked questions as soon as possible.

Are golf courses open in Tier 4 UK?

Golf courses are allowed to remain open in Tier 4.

Can you golf St. Andrews year round?

By George Peper This morning my regular golf game was cancelled because two of the guys backed out—the weather conditions were too brutal for them: 62 degrees and intermittent light showers. I live now in Florida. A decade ago, had those same conditions prevailed on a Saturday morning, all four players would have convened cheerily at the 1st tee, agreeing it was a lovely morning for a game. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 1) The Weather: Contrary to popular belief, winter conditions in Scotland, especially in St. Andrews and other areas of the east coast, are decidedly golfable. Yes, you’re on the same latitude as Moscow, but in contrast to Russia (and the northern tier of the U.S.,) the annual snowfall is an inch or two as opposed to a foot or five.

  • As for rain, Edinburgh gets no more than Rome does.
  • The average temperatures are in the 40s and 50s—chilly but not frigid.
  • Of course, when the wind kicks up, things get a bit more challenging, but if you layer-up wisely —long silk underwear, turtleneck, V-neck (or two), wind jacket, wool cap, two all-weather gloves—you’ll be surprised how comfy you’ll be, and with minimal swing restriction.
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(To stay even looser, consider observing a local custom and pack your golf bag with a wee flask of Scotland’s other gift to the world.) Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 2) The Course Access : Scottish courses are open all year round, but in winter the only people playing them are the locals. That’s particularly good news at St. Andrews where a tee time on the Old Course (a 50–50 proposition from April through October) is pretty much a slam dunk at this time of year.

  • See for yourself,
  • The daily ballot invariably has a few open times.
  • The only caveat: Since winter days in Scotland are short, so is the window of tee times—generally from about 8 a.m.
  • Until noon—so don’t plan on many 36-hole days.
  • That said, another winter benefit is the pace of play.
  • Since most of the play comes from the Scots, and everyone wants to get in before dark, there’s no mucking about.

Three-and-a-half-hour rounds are the norm. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 3) The Cost: Expect to pay half what you would in summer. Green fees on the Old are about $115 from November through March, exactly half the cost during peak season. Accommodations are even better deals. In mid-January, for instance, you can get a room at Rusacks Hotel overlooking the 18th hole of the Old Course for as little as $125, compared to $450 in mid-summer. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 4) The Course Conditions: Incredibly, the greens at links courses are almost as good in winter as in summer. With almost no grass growth, they remain tight and smooth. As for the fairways, with a “wee bone in the ground” they play harder and faster than ever. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 5) The Camaraderie : Show up at any Scottish golf course in mid-winter, and you’ll be welcomed warmly for your hardiness, your golf passion, and your good sense. Head over on a buddy trip, and you and your pals will return closer friends than ever, having enjoyed a special esprit de corps (similar to the bond shared by Siberian mailmen).

Is 30 too old for golf?

Modern Science – The evolution of sports and sports science has seen athletes prolong their careers for years longer than decades ago. According to a 2013 study, the a verage age of PGA tour golfers is around 35-years old. The good news from the research is that players can still turn professional even in their early 30s.

  • It was also found that the best years for a golf professional are between 30 and 35, although plenty of tour players have shown they can still win tournaments in their 40s.
  • Mental and physical skills begin to decrease as humans get into their late 30s, so anyone planning for a professional golf career better have received their tour card by then.

Nutrition and fitness may not be the first words associated with golf, but they play a major factor in a golfer’s performance. Like all professional athletes, golfers have a fitness routine and must stay physically fit to play at a top-level. John Daly may have won without having a true workout regimen and diet.

Is 13 too late to start golf?

So long as you focus on making it fun there is never a ‘right’ age to start playing golf and it is never too late to pick it up.

Can 80 year olds play golf?

Golf is one of the few sports that you can play regardless of age. Some golfers don’t learn how to play the game until they are 50 or 60 years old while others have been playing for decades. This is just one of the reasons that golf is, in my opinion, the best sport ever.

While you can play golf forever, it doesn’t always mean that it is an easy sport on your body. There is a lot happening in the golf swing that just isn’t a natural movement for the body. From swinging, walking, and constant movement, golf can get harder on your body as you age. But, golf is also a great form of exercise and an amazing way to spend time with family and friends.

You can enjoy the game with your kids, grandkids, friends, and even strangers. But things will change in your swing and game as you age. It’s about how you can adapt to make it enjoyable, safe, and play it for the long term. I want to help you combat father time and give you the ultimate golf guide for seniors.

What does 4 and 3 mean in golf?

‘Laying 3,’ ‘Lie 4’: What Those Golf Score Terms Mean On a television broadcast of a golf tournament, you might hear an announcer say, “She’s laying three.” Or on a golf course, you might an exchange between golfers: “What do you lie?” “I lie four.” What do those terms mean? They are scoring terms that tell you how many strokes the golfer has played so far.

  1. When a golfer says, “I’m laying three,” or “laying two” or “I lay four,” they are telling you that they have played three strokes so far on that hole, two strokes so far, or four strokes so far, respectively.
  2. The “lay” part of the expression refers to the golf ball being at rest.
  3. So before you play your next stroke, your score so far is, for example, three.

You lay three. The same with “lie two,” “lie three,” “lie four”: The “lie” part of the expression refers to your golf ball at rest, and the number represents the number of strokes you played to get your ball into that position. What do you lay when your ball is on the tee at the start of the hole? “I lie zero,” would technically be accurate, because no strokes have been played yet.

What is 5 and 4 in golf?

Basics of Match Play Scorekeeping – Simple: Win a hole, that’s one for you; lose a hole, that’s one for your opponent. Ties on individual holes (called halves ) essentially don’t count; they aren’t kept track of in the scorekeeping. The score of a match play match is rendered relationally.

Here’s what we mean: Let’s say you’ve won five holes and your opponent has won four. The score is not shown as 5 to 4; rather, it’s rendered as 1-up for you, or 1-down for your opponent. If you have won six holes and your opponent three, then you are leading 3-up, and your opponent is trailing 3-down.

Essentially, match play scoring tells golfers and spectators not how many holes each golfer has won, but how many more holes than his opponent the golfer in the lead has won. If the match is tied, it is said to be “all square.” (On leaderboards and in television graphics, all square is often abbreviated as “AS.”) Match play matches do not have to go the full 18 holes,

Do you need 4 people to play golf?

There is no limitation as per the Rules of Golf. In terms of playing formats the Rules however know the ‘foursome’, so having four players go out at once is certainly sensible, otherwise there could be no foursome. Typically you however do not allow golfers in groups of more than four.

Is a 2 handicap in golf good?

So how does your handicap stack up? Here are 8 takeaways: – 1. The average handicap index for men is 14.2.2. The average handicap index for women is 27.5.3. The most common handicap index range for men is 13.0-13.9, which consists of 5.42% or just more than 95,000 golfers. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 This chart reveals one of the biggest differences between high and low handicaps By: James Colgan 4. The most common women’s handicap is in the 27.0-27.9 range, which consists of 4.07%, or just under 18,000 golfers.5. There’s a logjam of men’s golfers who are low double-digit handicaps,

  1. Nearly one-quarter of men (21.16%) have handicaps ranging from 10.0-13.9.6.
  2. Are you a male with a 13.9 handicap or lower? Then you’re better than half the men with registered USGA handicaps, as 50.5% of handicaps are below 14.7.
  3. If your goal is to be in the top 10 percent of men’s golfers, here’s the handicap you need: 4.9 or better.

According to the statistics, 9.77% — or roughly 170,000-plus people — have handicaps below 5. And if you are looking to be in the top 5 percent of golfers, you need to sneak into that 2-handicap range. To be in the top 10 percent of women’s players you need a handicap of 14.9 or better.8. Can I Play Golf In Tier 4 USGA Can I Play Golf In Tier 4

What percentage of golfers are +2 handicap?

What Percentage Of Golfers Break Par? (and 70, 80, 90, 100)

Handicap Index Percent of Total Cumulative
1.1 to 1.9 1.26% 3.81%
2.0 to 2.9 1.62% 5.43%
3.0 to 3.9 2.07% 7.51%
4.0 to 4.9 2.60% 10.11%

What is a ghost player in golf?

“Ghost” Players or Teams – Some leagues have an odd number of players or teams, which requires them to have a “ghost”. A Ghost player or team is treated just like a real player or team who is absent for that round, and you will follow the same procedure when entering scores.

Is golf with friends 4 player?

Select a product Digital Golf With Your Friends Digital Golf With Your Friends – Deluxe Edition $26.99 Sale ends: 4/15/2023 at 11:59 PM PT Current Price: $5.99 Regular Price: $19.99 -70% Eligible for up to 30 Gold Points This item will be sent to your system automatically after purchase. Nothing is out of bounds as you take on courses filled with fast paced, exciting, simultaneous mini golf for up to 12 players! Key Features: 12 Player Multiplayer! Make sure your skills are up to scratch as you tee off against 11 other golfers in online multiplayer.

  • Themed Courses! Get the Par-Tee started and go head to head on themed courses! Become a pro in the pirate ship, declare worms warfare on the worms course or aim for an albatross in the ancient theme.
  • Powerups! Drive a wedge between your friends as you trap their ball in honey, freeze it or turn it into a cube.

Three Game Modes! Tee off in classic mini golf, shoot for the pars in hoops or swap the hole for a goal in hockey Customisations! Turn the fairway into the runway, with stylish hats, floaties and trails for your ball! Software description provided by the publisher. TV mode, Tabletop mode, Handheld mode English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Traditional Chinese WARNING: If you have epilepsy or have had seizures or other unusual reactions to flashing lights or patterns, consult a doctor before playing video games.

All users should read the Health and Safety Information available in the system settings before using this software. Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) and Nintendo Account required for online play. Not available in all countries. Internet access required for online features. Terms apply.

nintendo.com/switch-online Golf With Your Friends © 2020 Blacklight Interactive, Co-developed and Published under licence by Team17 Digital Limited. Golf With Your Friends is a trade mark of Entertainment Holding Pty Ltd used under licence by Team17 Digital Limited.

What is a group of 4 golfers called?

Golf Terminology | Golf Course Management | Las Vegas Golf Organizing a golf outing can be intimidating at times, so we have gathered some of the most common golf terms and phrases you might encounter. If you come across something not on the list, just ask and we’ll be happy to explain.

A more comprehensive listing can be found on the website.19th Hole The clubhouse bar. Players typically gather in the 19th Hole after their round to tally scores, settle bets and enjoy some beverages. Ace When a player hits the ball directly from the tee into the hole with one stroke. Also called a hole in one.

Albatross A hole played three strokes under par, also called a Double Eagle. Approach shot A shot intended to land the ball on the green. Apron The grass surface on the perimeter of the green that separates it from the surrounding fairway or rough. Also known as the fringe.

Automatic Two-putt When a golf course, or tournament, declares that players may consider the ball to be holed in no more than two putts once their ball is on the putting surface (most commonly used as a tournament rule to speed up play) Example: Automatic two-putt is not allowed within the rules of golf, but courses can institute it as a local rule in casual play when conditions warrant.

Away Describing the golfer whose ball is farthest from the hole. The player who is away should always play first. Back nine The last nine holes of an 18 hole golf course. Playing the back nine is called “heading in”.

  • Backswing The backward part of the swing starting from the ground and going back behind the head.
  • Ball-marker A token or a small coin used to spot the ball’s position on the green prior to lifting it.
  • Ball-washer A device found on many tee boxes for cleaning golf balls.

Best ball A form of team play using two, three, or four person teams. The team score on each hole is the lowest score obtained by one of the team members. For example, if player A has a 5, player B has a 6, player C has a 4, and player D has a 5, the “best ball” and team score is a 4.

Birdie A hole played in one stroke under par. Bogey A hole played one stroke over par. Break The tendency of a putted ball to roll left or right of a straight line. This deviation may be a result of a number of factors or combination of factors including uneven surface, grain of the grass, how firmly the putt is struck or, in extreme circumstances, wind.

Bump and run A low-trajectory shot that is intended to get the ball rolling along the fairway and up onto the green. Similar to a chip shot, but played from a greater distance. Bunker A depression in bare ground that is usually covered with sand. Also called a “sand trap”.

It is considered a hazard under the Rules of Golf. Caddy or Caddie A person, often paid, who carries a player’s clubs and offers advice. Players are responsible for the actions of their caddies. Players cannot receive advice from anyone other than their caddy or partner. Carry How far the ball travels through the air.

Casual water Any temporary standing water visible after a player has taken his stance. Snow and ice can also be taken as casual water, as well as water that overflows the banks of existing water hazards. You may take relief from casual water no nearer to the hole according to the rules of golf.

Chip A short shot (typically played from very close to and around the green), that is intended to travel through the air over a very short distance and roll the remainder of the way to the hole. Chunk A swing that results in the clubhead hitting the ground before the ball, resulting in a large chunk of ground being taken as a divot.

Also called a “fat” shot, or “chili-dipping”. Club (i) An implement used by a player to hit a golf ball. A player is allowed to carry up to fourteen (14) clubs during a round of golf. (ii) An organized group of golfers, usually owning or managing a golf course.

  1. Iii) The entirety of a golf facility, including course, club-house, pro-shop, practice areas etc.
  2. Clubhead The part of a club that used to strike the ball.
  3. Clubface The surface of the clubhead which is designed to strike the golf ball.
  4. Striking the ball with the center of the clubface maximizes distance and accuracy.

Course Rating Course rating is a numerical value given to each set of tees at a particular golf course to approximate the number of strokes it should take a scratch golfer to complete the course. Dimples The round indentations on a golf ball cover which are scientifically designed to enable the ball to make a steady and true flight.

See also:  Welches Tier Jahr Ist 2023?

Dimples, by reducing drag, allow a golf ball to stay in the air for a longer flight than would be possible with a smooth ball. Divot (i) The chunk of grass and earth displaced during a stroke. (ii) The indentation on the green caused by the ball on an approach shot; more properly called a pitch mark or ball mark.

Dogleg A left or right bend in the fairway. Double bogey A hole played two strokes over par. Double eagle A hole played three strokes under par. Also called an Albatross. Downswing The motion of swinging a club from the top of the swing to the point of impact.

Draw A shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves to the left; often played intentionally by skilled golfers. An overdone draw usually becomes a hook. Eagle A hole played in two strokes under par. Even Having a score equal to that of par. Fade A shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves slightly to the right, and is often played intentionally by skilled golfers.

An overdone fade will appear similar to a slice. Fairway The area of the course between the tee and the green that is well-maintained allowing a good lie for the ball. Flagstick A tall marker, often a metal pole with a flag at the top, used to indicate the position of the hole on a green.

  • Also called the “pin”.
  • An additional smaller flag, or other marker, is sometimes positioned on the flagstick to indicate the location of the hole (front, middle, or back) on the green.
  • Fore A warning shout given when there is a chance that the ball may hit other players or spectators.
  • Fourball In matchplay, a contest between two sides, each consisting of a pair of players, where every individual plays his own ball throughout.

On every hole, the lower of the two partner’s scores is matched against the lower of the opposition’s scores. (Fourballs are the opening matches played on the Friday and Saturday mornings of the Ryder Cup). In strokeplay, a fourball competition is played between several teams each consisting of 2 players, where for every hole the lower of the two partner’s scores counts toward the team’s 18 hole total.

  • The term ‘fourball’ is often used informally to describe any group of 4 players on the course.
  • Foursomes In matchplay, a contest between two sides each consisting of a pair of players, where the 2 partners hit alternate shots on one ball.
  • The first player tees off, the second player hits the second shot, the first player hits the third shot, and so on until the ball is holed.

Also partners alternate their tee shots, so that one member of each team will always tee-off on the odd holes and the other will tee off on the even holes. (Foursomes are the afternoon matches played on the Friday and Saturday of the Ryder Cup). In strokeplay, a foursome competition is played between several teams each consisting of a pair of players, where partners play alternate shots until the SINGLE ball is holed.

The term ‘foursome’ is often incorrectly used to describe any group of 4 players on the course. Front Nine Holes 1 through 9 on a golf course. Gimme Refers to a putt that the other players agree can count automatically without actually being played (under the tacit assumption that the putt would not have been missed).

“Gimmes” are not allowed by the rules in stroke play, but they are often practiced in casual matches. However, in match play, either player may formally concede a stroke, a hole, or the entire match at any time, and this may not be refused or withdrawn.

  • A player in match play will generally concede a tap-in or other short putt by his or her opponent.
  • Golf club (i) An implement used by a player to hit a golf ball.
  • A player is allowed to carry up to fourteen (14) clubs during a round of golf.
  • Ii) An organized group of golfers, usually owning or managing a golf course.

(iii) The entirety of a golf facility, including course, club-house, pro-shop, practice areas etc. Green The area of specially prepared grass around the hole, where putts are played. Handicap A number assigned to each player based on his ability and used to adjust each player’s score to provide equality among the players.

  • In simplified terms, a handicap number, based on the slope of a course, is subtracted from the player’s gross score and gives him a net score of par or better half the time.
  • Hazard Any bunker or permanent water including any ground marked as part of that water hazard.
  • Special rules apply when playing from a hazard.

Hole A circular hole in the ground which is also called “the cup”, 4.25 inches in diameter.

  1. Hole in One Getting the ball directly from the tee into the hole with one stroke.
  2. Iron A club with a flat-faced solid metal head generally numbered from 1 to 9 indicating increasing loft.
  3. Knock-down A type of shot designed to have a very low trajectory, usually employed to combat strong winds.

Lie (i) How the ball is resting on the ground, which may add to the difficulty of the next stroke. (ii) The angle between the center of the shaft and the sole of the clubhead. Line The path the ball it expected to take following a stroke. This is of particular importance on the green, where stepping on another player’s line is considered a breach of etiquette.

Links A type of golf course, usually along a stretch of coastline. Loft The angle between the club’s shaft and the club’s face. Mulligan A do-over, or replay of the shot, without counting the shot as a stroke and without assessing any penalties that might apply. It is not allowed by the rules and not practiced in official tournaments, but is common in casual rounds in some countries, especially the United States.

Charity tournaments can use the sale of mulligan tickets to raise additional revenue. Out-of-bounds The area designated as being outside the boundaries of the course. When a shot lands “O.B.”, the player “loses stroke and distance”, meaning that he/she must hit another shot from the original spot and is assessed a one-stroke penalty.

  • Par Apocryphally an abbreviation for “professional average result”, standard score for a hole (defined by its length) or a course (sum of all the holes’ pars).
  • Pin Slang for “flagstick”.
  • Pitch a short shot (typically from within 50 yards), usually played with a higher lofted club and made using a less than full swing, that is intended to flight the ball toward a target (usually the hole) with greater accuracy than a full iron shot.

Pitch mark Another term for a divot on the green caused when a ball lands. Players must repair their pitch marks, usually with a tee or a divot tool. Play Through Permission granted by a slow-moving group of players to a faster-moving group of players to pass them on the course.

  1. Pro A professional is a golfer or person who plays or teaches golf for financial reward, may work as a touring pro in professional competitions, or as a teaching pro (also called a club pro).
  2. Punch shot A shot played with a very low trajectory, usually to avoid interference from tree branches when a player is hitting from the woods.

Similar to the knock-down, it can also be used to avoid high winds.

  1. Putt A shot played on the green, usually with a putter.
  2. Putting green A green usually found close to the club house used for warm up and to practice putting.
  3. Putter A special golf club with a very low loft that makes the ball roll.
  4. Rough The grass that borders the fairway, usually taller and coarser than the fairway.

Sand wedge A lofted club designed especially for playing out of a bunker. The modern sand wedge was invented by Gene Sarazen. Scramble When a player misses the green in regulation, but still makes par or better on a hole. Scrambling percentage is one of many statistics kept by the PGA Tour.

Also a two or four man format, similar to Best Ball, except in a scramble, each player strikes a shot, the best shot is selected, then all players play from that selected position. Scratch golfer A player’s whose handicap equals zero. Shamble A format, similar to a scramble, where every player hits from the tee, the best tee-shot is selected, and each player holes-out from the selected tee-shot.

Short game Shots that take place on or near the green. Putting, chipping, pitching, and greenside bunker play are all aspects of the short game. Slice A poor shot that, for a right-handed golfer, curves sharply from the left to the right. A shot that follows the same direction but to a lesser degree is referred to as a fade or a cut and is often intentional.

  1. The curved shape of the flight of the ball is a result of sideways spin.
  2. For that reason “slice” does not refer to a putt which “breaks”.
  3. Slope Rating Slope Rating is a number, from 55 to 155, used to determine the level of difficulty of a golf course for a bogey golfer.
  4. An “average” course has a slope rating of 113.

Snowman To score an eight on a hole. So-named because an eight (8) looks similar to the body of a snowman. Stableford A points based scoring system. The number of strokes taken on each hole relative to par translates into a set number of points, with the winner being the player who accumulates the highest number of points.

  • Tap-in A ball that has come to rest very close to the hole, leaving only a very short putt to be played.
  • Often recreational golfers will “concede” tap-ins to each other to speed up the pace of play.
  • Tee A small peg, usually made of wood or plastic, placed in the ground upon which the golf ball may be placed prior to the first stroke on a hole.

May also refer to the teeing ground. Teeing Group The area from which you hit your drive or tee shot. The teeing ground for a particular set of tees is two club lengths in depth. The ball must be teed between the markers, called tees, that define the teeing ground’s width, and no further back than its depth.

Tees are colored, but there is no standard for colors. The “teeing ground” refers to one set of tees. Most courses have at least three sets of tees, some have more than twice that many. The areas where tee markers are placed are called “tee boxes”. Tips The championship tees on a golf course are known as “the tips”.

At Silverstone, the tips would be our set of silver tees. Topped An errant shot where the clubhead strikes on top of the ball, causing the ball to roll or bounce rather than fly. Unplayable A player can declare his ball unplayable at any time when it is in play (other than at a tee), and can drop the ball either within two club-lengths, or further from the hole in line with the hole and its current position, or where he played his last shot.

  • A penalty of one stroke is applied.
  • A ball declared unplayable within a hazard must be dropped within that same hazard.
  • Up and down Describes the situation where a player holes the ball in two strokes starting from off the green.
  • The first stroke, usually a pitch, a bunker shot or a chip, gets the ball ‘up’ onto the green, and the subsequent putt gets the ball ‘down’ into the hole.

A variation is called “up and in”. Wedge A type of golf club; a subset of iron designed for short range strokes. Whiff An attempt to strike the ball where the player fails to make contact with the ball. A whiff must be counted as a stroke. Wood A type of club where the head is generally bulbous in shape except for the flatter clubface.

How many people can go golfing in a group?

Play of the game – 1=teeing ground, 2=water hazard, 3=rough, 4=out of bounds, 5= sand bunker, 6=water hazard, 7=fairway, 8=putting green, 9=flagstick, 10=hole Every round of golf is based on playing a number of holes in a given order. A “round” typically consists of 18 holes that are played in the order determined by the course layout.

Each hole is played once in the round on a standard course of 18 holes. The game can be played by any number of people, although a typical group will have 1–4 people playing the round. The typical amount of time required for pace of play is two hours for a 9-hole round and four hours for an 18-hole round.

Playing a hole on a golf course is initiated by putting a ball into play by striking it with a club on the teeing ground (also called the tee box, or simply the tee). For this first shot on each hole, it is allowed but not required for the golfer to place the ball on a tee prior to striking it.

A tee is a small peg that can be used to elevate the ball slightly above the ground up to a few centimetres high. Tees are commonly made of wood but may be constructed of any material, including plastic. Traditionally, golfers used mounds of sand to elevate the ball, and containers of sand were provided for the purpose.

A few courses still require sand to be used instead of peg tees, to reduce litter and reduce damage to the teeing ground. Tees help reduce the interference of the ground or grass on the movement of the club making the ball easier to hit, and also places the ball in the very centre of the striking face of the club (the “sweet spot”) for better distance.

When the initial shot on a hole is intended to move the ball a long distance, typically more than 225 yards (210 m), the shot is commonly called a “drive” and is generally made with a long-shafted, large-headed wood club called a “driver”. Shorter holes may be initiated with other clubs, such as higher-numbered woods or irons,

Once the ball comes to rest, the golfer strikes it again as many times as necessary using shots that are variously known as a “lay-up”, an “approach”, a “pitch”, or a ” chip “, until the ball reaches the green, where the golfer then ” putts ” the ball into the hole (commonly called “sinking the putt” or “holing out”).

The goal of getting the ball into the hole (“holing” the ball) in as few strokes as possible may be impeded by obstacles such as areas of longer grass called “rough” (usually found alongside fairways), which both slows any ball that contacts it and makes it harder to advance a ball that has stopped on it; “doglegs”, which are changes in the direction of the fairway that often require shorter shots to play around them; bunkers (or sand traps); and water hazards such as ponds or streams.

In stroke play competitions each player plays their ball until it is holed no matter how many strokes that may take. In match play it is acceptable to simply pick up one’s ball and “surrender the hole” after enough strokes have been made by a player that it is mathematically impossible for the player to win the hole.

It is also acceptable in informal stroke play to surrender the hole after hitting three strokes more than the “par” rating of the hole (a “triple bogey” – see below); while technically a violation of Rule 3–2, this practice speeds play as a courtesy to others, and avoids “runaway scores” and excessive frustration.

The total distance from the first teeing ground to the 18th green can be quite long; total yardages “through the green” can be in excess of 7,000 yards (6.4 km), and when adding in the travel distance between the green of one hole and the tee of the next, even skilled players may easily travel five miles (8 km) or more during a round.

At some courses, gas or electric golf carts are used to travel between shots, which can speed-up play and allows participation by individuals unable to walk a whole round. On other courses players generally walk the course, either carrying their bag using a shoulder strap or using a “golf trolley” for their bag.

These trolleys may or may not be battery assisted. At many amateur tournaments including U.S. high school and college play, players are required to walk and to carry their own bags, but at the professional and top amateur level, as well as at high-level private clubs, players may be accompanied by caddies, who carry and manage the players’ equipment and who are allowed by the rules to give advice on the play of the course.